Alone again

Sep. 23rd, 2017 06:36 pm
mirabile: made just for me (Default)
[personal profile] mirabile
Well, this morning my sister and her wife flew back to Hawaii after an eight-day visit here. We were up at 4:30 and out the door by five to take them to the airport, so I'm a bit tired, but I'm also really sad. I like my sister very much, and this was a great visit. They stayed with us, in our new den/guest room, which worked really well and, they tell us, was very comfortable. Yay! I took some photos, which didn't really turn out, but I'll post two anyway so you can see the new blinds on the French doors:

Den_blinds_outdoors


And here is the other end of the den:

Den_southend


We really like the blinds but mostly we like that they're installed because that's the official end of the remodel. We might do more stuff later, but right now, that's it. Done and dusted.

I spent several hours with Mother today, too, and as she said, it helped ease the pain of losing my sister until she returns in February. We had a quiet day, spending part of it in the garden, and then I massaged lotion on her arms and legs and rubbed her feet.

Anyway, my sister is three thousand miles away.

Because they were here and we were so busy, I didn't practice ukulele or yoga, and I didn't read much online. I do have a few links but first I want to recommend the documentary Score. I loved it so much and am encouraging Webster to see it as well. I gather it was kickstarter funded??? Whatever, it was really interesting and I learned a lot.

I also want to recommend a new-to-me podcast, The Fall Line. I learned about it from Georgia Hardstarck on My Favorite Murder and I'm grateful she mentioned it. Dannette and Jeannette Millbrook (often misnamed as "Millbrooks"), 15, disappeared on the afternoon of March 18, 1990. They have not been seen since. Their case was closed in 1991, and not reopened until 2013. Many neighbors expressed surprise, stating that they didn't even know the girls had gone missing, or that they heard the twins had been found.

What happened to the twins? Why was their case closed? Why did they receive so little media attention? Where does their case stand now?
Heartbreaking. Similar in structure to Somebody Knows Something, another great podcast.

I miss the ocean! So I really enjoyed this timelapse of a thirty day sea voyage. Found via Kottke, of course.

Alas, I have been paying attention to politics and we have called both our senators about that horrible health care bill, fat lot of good that will do. But as a Bay Area girl in my heart, I was pretty thrilled to read the official Golden State Warriors statement: We believe there is nothing more American than our citizens having the right to express themselves freely on matters important to them. Ha!

And that's it from me. I need to recover a bit, get back into uke and yoga, and of course catch up with all of you. I hope you are well.

England April 15

Sep. 19th, 2017 07:16 pm
archaeologist_d: (Tintern Abbey)
[personal profile] archaeologist_d
April 15 – Met up with clara_posts at St Pauls, then we had a quick breakfast and it was off to the Guildhall. Underneath is the remains of a Roman amphitheater and I think they did the exhibit very well. After that, we went into the main Guildhall (a bit intimidating to get into and it wasn’t obvious at all) and looked at all the carvings, etc. Off to the Museum of London next to see if there were any new exhibits that didn’t cost anything (there wasn’t). We stopped for lunch at The George, the last galleried inn in London. Very old, dating from the 17th century. Then we wandered around a bit before she had to go off to do her volunteering at the Sam Wanamaker Theater and shortly after that, I found my seat to see Othello.

Interesting stage production, only candle light with real candles, and the acting was great. The play, while lovely language, just showed how much of an idiot Othello was. Then it was back to the hotel.

St Pauls
St Pauls, London

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janedavitt: (starbyme)
[personal profile] janedavitt
I'd already part-edited Wild Raspberries so it didn't take too long to get it ready to post. The sequel Wintergreen will take a week or so to get ready.

When runaway Daniel Seaton inadvertently trespasses on Tyler Edward's land, Tyler nearly shoots him on sight.

Tyler's got a lot of years under his belt, and his past doesn't let him accept strangers easily. Dan's situation is dire enough that Tyler takes him home, at least for a little while, and that turns out to be a good decision when Tyler's injured and needs Dan's help.

Tyler's learning to trust, and Dan's settling in to a new life, but things aren't always what they seem. Between interfering friends, injuries, and their attraction to each other, Tyler and Dan have plenty of to deal with even before Tyler's previous career returns to haunt them. Can they overcome what lies in the past to have a future with each other?



Wild Raspberries at AO3

Free Book!

Sep. 16th, 2017 09:47 pm
janedavitt: (chainsbyme)
[personal profile] janedavitt
I got my Torquere books back and after reworking one to sell decided that I'd edit them to bring them in line with my current style (way less... and --) and offer them free as a thank you to all the kind readers out there.

The first of them, Drawing Closer, is also my first novel, published back in 2006. It's at AO3 and it's mild BDSM.

Charles is a professor, an expatriate Brit, and a man with a past. He's put that aside, living the peaceful life he thinks he needs. He figures he's happy.

Until he meets Gray Collins, that is. Persistent, stubborn, and hot, Gray turns Charles's world upside down and brings him a future he never expected, with links to a past he's tried to forget.


Drawing Closer

England April 12

Sep. 15th, 2017 05:20 pm
archaeologist_d: (Tintern Abbey)
[personal profile] archaeologist_d
April 12 – I had a long list of things to see and only a day to see them. So I was off pretty early, driving south first and then driving around the island. First up was The Braaid, a 9th century iron age round house and 2 rectangular ones. It was way out in the countryside (as was most of the sites I went to). It was cold as heck, the wind was whipping up, and no sun so I was shivering even with 2 layers on but the views were spectacular.

Then since I was close to a location that I’d tried and failed to find yesterday, I gave it another go and was able to find it. Cronk ny Merriu was a Viking cliff-top fortification high above the Port Grenaugh beach. It was just me and the sea gulls but I loved the views again.

The Ballakelly chambered tomb was impossible to get to. It’s on private land and although I was able to find a place to park (always a problem on Man), there was no open or unlockable gate. So I only saw it from a distance.

I also stopped at the Balladoole Viking heritage site to look at the boat burial site. There was also a keele there.

Since it was getting later and the threat of rain was increasing by the minute, I drove to Meayll Hill Circle. I was able to park fairly easily at the bottom of the hill, but the climb up the hill was hard, steep, and muddy. Also the temperature had dropped, the wind was howling, and at this point, I had 3 layers on and it wasn’t comfortable at all. But the site was amazing!!!! Six narrow Neolithic/Bronze age tombs high on the top of a steep hill, situated around in a circle. Locals call it Druid hill but no Druids there. The views were spectacular yet again even though just as I was done, it began to drizzle. The temperatures dropped further so I left.

I decided at this point to mix it up a bit so I went to Peel Castle which was out on a promontory with lots of harbor boats around. Ruins, of course, and quite extensive. Since I had a National Trust membership, I got in for free. Lovely castle and I was very glad I went. As a little aside, some guy was wandering around and I swear at first he looked just like Tennant’s Doctor Who, with the same hair and raincoat. I had to get pretty close before I could see that it wasn’t Tennant (not that I thought he was since David is doing a play in London) but I thought it was great that the Doctor would be wandering around ruins!

The Ballaharra Stones were right next to the road with easy parking nearby (finally). So a quick stop there and I walked over to the Giant’s Tomb which was in the wall in a road just up the street.

It was raining and miserable but I pressed on. I was going to try a garden estate but decided I’d rather see more archaeology since I can see gardens anywhere. And the best was next!! It was hard to find parking as it was a one lane road but there was a little layby close so I was able to walk up to Cashel yn Ard. And what a site! Neolithic chambered tombs, in a clear line plus lots of upright stones. No one there but me and the sheep. This was the best archaeological site on the island, imo. And the sun came out and it was nicer and much warmer although certainly not warm enough for me. But I did linger since the site was so lovely.

On the way out, I stopped at the Ballaglass Glen for a quick walk. It was very lovely with lots of little waterfalls and no one in sight. I lingered a bit soaking in the quiet.

At this point, it was getting late but there was still plenty of sunlight left so I backtracked a bit and went to Kirk Maughhold which was a working church but there were keeills (early Christian chapels) and lots of early Christian Celtic crosses just outside. They were all pretty worn but I could still see some of the carvings so I was happy.

Last on my list was King Orry’s Grave. Easy to find parking! There were two locations just across the street from each other. They were pretty impressive. The stones were quite large and there were chambered Neolithic tombs. This was probably my second favorite after Cashel – and a lot easier to get to.

Then I gave up and drove to Douglas to my hotel. I think I saw quite a bit!



The Braaid
P1090644 The Braaid, isle of man (6)
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(no subject)

Sep. 11th, 2017 03:19 pm
mirabile: (San Francisco)
[personal profile] mirabile
Hello, hello! I hope you are all well and that hurricanes will stop hurricaning for a while. We have friends on the east coast of Florida who went to Orlando to escape Irma, but my goodness, the flooding there! We haven't heard from them since Friday so my fingers are crossed.

We are fine. Webster actually went swimming with me two mornings this week! He hasn't felt well enough to do that in months. I've been cleaning house like mad because my sister and her wife arrive Thursday night. Yay! I'm so looking forward to their visit, and of course Mother is over the moon. That's one thing she remembers, that my sister is coming out.

In case you missed all the headers and announcements, it's the OTW's tenth anniversary. Ten years! And I'm very proud to say I was there at the start. I love the OTW despite its well known faults, and I adore the AO3. Bless every volunteer and all their hard work. Anyway, Tumblr user Gins posted an essay I enjoyed: A few notes on the past ten years, and so on: I don't think it's a coincidence that there is, broadly speaking, a strong correlation between the people who would like me to write my experience of queerness and womanhood differently and the people who dismiss the artistic import and value of fannish art, and art about fandom. Fandom is one of those rare artistic communities that was built, in large part, by and for women and queer people; this is not to say there aren't people who are neither in fandom, but to instead say that womanhood and queerness have architectural significance to fandom as an artistic space. Excellent essay covering a number of subjects important to me.

Okay, lots of links to share with you:
'Plagiarists never do it once': meet the sleuth tracking down the poetry cheats: When teaching, I had the bad luck to run into a fair bit of plagiarism from my students. To this day, I wonder if I somehow didn't make clear what plagiarism was and why they shouldn't plagiarize. I've also caught some plagiarisms in fandom. It is very very unpleasant.

An essay by Cecilia Tan, Let Me Tell You, about the old saw "show, don't tell," which I have to tell you drives me wild. Literary fiction, I fear, is beyond help because of its overreliance on shared knowledge for its power. The only way to meet the literary "standard" of a "universal" story while writing about any marginalized individual -- whether by culture or subculture, whether of color, queer, or even just a woman -- is to make the story accessible to the educated white upper middle-class point of view.

Over at Think Progress I read about this incredible Twitter account, World War II, one tweet at a time. The Twitter account just started repeating after six years of tweeting, so this isn't exactly news, but you can start here and go forward. Honestly, I had no idea about most of the things that happened in September 1939. I dislike Twitter, even though I've had an account since the business started, so I keep the WW2 Tweets account up on a separate page and refresh periodically. Some days he posts many times, others just a bit. Also: my god, but the Poles were astoundingly brave! Get this: At Wizna village, 720 Polish soldiers in small forts have held back 42,000 Germans & 300 tanks for 3 days, stopping Guderian's panzer corps.

Really beautiful images and clear explanations of Cassini's jaw-dropping discoveries of Saturn's moons. (On Friday, the Cassini space probe will burn up in Saturn's atmosphere, and even though it's for SCIENCE, that still makes me sad.)

I just learned about this Kickstarter project so I didn't contribute any money, but it sounds like a hoot: Barry & Joe -- the animated series. These are the adventures of Barack Obama and Joe Biden bromancing the multiverse as they try and save us from ourselves.

Time for a little yoga, I think, and then what shall I do about dinner? Quesadillas and a salad maybe?

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